Friday, September 15, 2017

Call for Proposals for Presentation at the 2018 ALA Annual IRRT Pre-Conference


Librarians and libraries play an important role in serving and advocating for immigrant and refugee populations. The American Library Association (ALA) International Relations Round Table (IRRT) invites you to submit presentation proposals for their 2018 pre-conference workshop in New Orleans, Louisiana, on Friday, June 22, 2018 from 8am-1pm.

Possible proposal topics include:

·         Practical and real-life examples of services for immigrants and/or refugees
·         Targeted outreach to immigrants and/or refugees
·         Examples of successfully implemented programs
·         Working with targeted populations both in the USA and/or internationally
·         Advice about implementing services or programs
·         How to best reach out to immigrants and/or refugees
·         How to develop programs featuring social, economic, health, literacy, and/or technology
·         How to secure support for these programs

We are flexible about presentation length, however, presentations should engage the audience. Presentations that will utilize hands-on activities are encouraged.  

To submit a proposal, send an email to co-chairs Charissa Powell (powell.charissa@gmail.com) and Elizabeth Soergel (elizsoergel@gmail.com) by end-of-business on October 20, 2017  Please include your name, institutional affiliation, working title, and 300 word maximum description of your presentation.

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Minitalks on Libraries, Literatures and Literacies in English and Spanish

The Information School of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the Mortenson Center for International Library Programs have collaborated to present a series of mini-talks to the international library community that include presentations in English and Spanish. The format is 15 minutes presentation + 15 minutes discussion for a total of 30 learning minutes.

Minitalks are open to all who wish to participate. More information about the talks and the schedule can be found at https://publish.illinois.edu/minitalks/ 
Attend the minitalks at go.illinois.edu/minitalks-room

Comments and ideas are welcome to either Kate Williams (katewill@illinois.edu) or Jean Kanengoni (jeansk2@illinois.edu). The September schedule is as follows:

Tuesday, August 29 in English - Elizabeth MacLeod, Manager of Satellite Digitization Services, Internet Archive, Wilmington, NC "The Community Webs project at the Internet Archive."
A
rchived at http://media.ischool.illinois.edu/dl/events/lllfa17/aug29_17.mp4
 
Thursday, September 7, in English - Clara M. Chu, Director and Mortenson Distinguished Professor, Mortenson Center for International Library Programs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign "Libraries for Peace: An Initiative to Build Peaceful and Sustainable Communities."  

Tuesday, September 12, 5:30-6 pm (CT, UTC-06:00), in English - Don Krummel, Professor Emeritus, iSchool "The Anatomy of Bibliography."

Thursday, September 21, 8-8:30 am (CT, UTC-06:00), en Español TBA

Tuesday, September 26, 5:30-6 pm (CT, UTC-06:00), in English - Karen Fisher, University of Washington, on information and technology services to refugees based on her work in Syria.

=======
 
El iSchool de Illinois y el Centro Mortenson para Programas de Bibliotecas Internacionales están entusiasmados por colaborar en presentar una serie de minitalks (presentaciones breves) a la comunidad internacional de bibliotecarios tanto como oradores o como oyentes, que incluirán presentaciones en inglés y español. El formato es de 15 minutos de presentación + 15 minutos de discusión = 30 minutos de aprendizaje.

Los Minitalks están abiertos a todo/as. Para obtener más información y la programación actualizada, consulte: https://publish.illinois.edu/minitalks/ Para asistir, conecte a go.illinois.edu/minitalks-room. Nota: Es mejor acceder con Internet de alta velocidad y auriculares (auriculares y micrófono), utilizando el navegador Chrome, pero se pueden utilizar otros si Flash Player está instalado en el ordenador.

Todos comentarios e ideas son bienvenidos a Kate Williams <katewill@illinois.edu> o a Jean Kanengoni <jeansk2@illinois.edu>.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Jay Jordan IFLA/OCLC Early Career Development Fellowship Program

Applications are open for library professionals to participate in the 2018 Jay Jordan IFLA/OCLC Early Career Development Fellowship Program.
The Fellowship Program is an intensive four-week program based at OCLC headquarters in Dublin, Ohio, USA, that provides education and professional development opportunities for early career librarians from countries with developing economies. It is jointly sponsored by IFLA and OCLC. The 2018 program will run from 17 March to 13 April 2018.
Up to five individuals are selected each year. The program gives Fellows opportunities to meet with leading information practitioners and explore topics including information technologies, library operations and management, and global cooperative librarianship.
Eligibility is limited to those from a qualifying country who have a degree in library or information science obtained within the past five years and have at least three but no more than eight years of library or information science experience. 
Details about the program, guidelines and applications are now available on the OCLC website. Deadline for applications is 6 October 2017.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

[ELEARN] CFP: IEEE TETC, Special Issue on Scholarly Big Data, Deadline: December 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

IEEE Transactions on Emerging Topics in Computing Special Issue on Scholarly Big Data 

IEEE Transaction on Emerging Topics in Computing (TETC) seeks original manuscripts for a Special Issue/Section on Scholarly Big Data scheduled to appear in the fourth issue of 2018.

Recent years have witnessed the rapid growth of scholarly information due to advancements in information and communication technologies. Scholarly big data is the vast quantity of research output, which can be acquired from digital libraries, such as journal articles, conference proceedings, theses, books, patents, experimental data, etc. It also encompasses various scholarly related data, such as author demography, academic social networks, and academic activity. The abundance of scholarly data sources enables researchers to study the academic society from a big data perspective. The dynamic and diverse nature of scholarly big data requires different data management techniques and advanced data analysis methods. Today’s researchers realize that new scholarly-big-data specific platform/management/techniques/ are needed. Therefore, a set of emerging topics such as scholarly big data acquisition, storage, management and processing are important issues for the research community. Manuscripts submitted to TETC should be computing focused.

This special issue focuses on covering the most recent research results in scholarly big data management and computing. The issue welcomes both theoretical and applied research (e.g. platforms and applications). It will encourage the effort to share data, advocate gold-standard evaluation among shared data, and promote the exploration of new directions. Topics of interest include (but not limited to): 
* New approaches to search and crawling of scholarly big data from various data sources
* Methods for storing, indexing, and query processing for scholarly big data
* Practices for scholarly big data management and sharing
* Heterogeneous scholarly big data source integration, especially for novel datasets (e.g. online social media)
* Scholarly big data analysis, mining, and visualization
* Design of next generation scholarly big data platforms and systems
* Algorithms for measuring the scientific impact of articles, authors, institutions, etc.
* Scientific information network analysis
* Recommendation tools and techniques
* Scientific community detection and clustering
* Graph and text mining in scholarly big data
* Privacy and security issues
* Services and applications

Reference:
Feng Xia, Wei Wang, Teshome Megersa Bekele, Huan Liu. Big Scholarly Data: A Survey, IEEE Transactions on Big Data, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2017, pp: 18 - 35. DOI: 10.1109/TBDATA.2016.2641460

Submitted articles must not have been previously published or currently submitted for journal publication elsewhere. As an author, you are responsible for understanding and adhering to the IEEE submission guidelines. You can access them at the IEEE Computer Society web site, www.computer.org. These should be carefully read before manuscript submission. Please submit your manuscript to Manuscript Central at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tetc-cs

Please note the following important dates.
Submission Deadline: Dec. 1, 2017
Reviews Completed: Mar. 1, 2018
Major Revisions Due (if Needed): April 1, 2018
Reviews of Revisions Completed (if Needed): May 1, 2018
Minor Revisions Due (if Needed): June 1, 2018
Notification of Final Acceptance: August 1, 2018
Publication Materials for Final Manuscripts Due: Sept 1, 2018
Publication date: Last Issue of 2018 (December Issue)

Guest Editors

Feng Xia
Dalian University of Technology, China

Huan Liu
Arizona State University, USA

C. Lee Giles
Pennsylvania State University, USA

Kuansan Wang
Microsoft Research, USA

**** Call For Presentations **** Innovating with Metadata: An Amigos Online Conference

**** Call For Presentations ****
Innovating with Metadata: An Amigos Online Conference

When: Thursday, November 9, 2017, 10:00am- 4:00pm Central Time
Where: Amigos Online Classroom 

Today’s metadata is not yesterday’s cataloging.  Libraries are doing amazing things with all kinds of metadata from many sources.  How is your library innovating with metadata? We would like to hear from you!  Possible topics include:
  • New metadata standards and application profiles
  • Transforming and exchanging metadata within and between organizations
  • Automated ways of generating discovery, preservation and technical metadata
  • New systems; innovative uses of institutional repositories, image management systems, discovery layers 
  • Creative uses of linked data and RDF
  • Transitioning from MARC to BIBFRAME
  • Innovating with metadata on a shoe-string budget

Each session will be 45 minutes in length.  If you're interested in presenting, but have never done it online, don't worry -- we will teach you what you need to know!  We welcome submissions from staff in academic, public and special libraries who work with metadata. 

To submit your presentation idea(s), send us your proposal tohttps://www.amigos.org/node/4657 by August 31st. If you are interested in attending, save the date!  We will be posting registration information in Early October. 


Christine Peterson
Continuing Education Librarian, Technology
Coordinator, AskAcademic Virtual Reference Service
Amigos Library Services

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Help unite the global library field in a vision for the future


The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is encouraging library staff around the world to share their opinions on a proposed Global Vision for how a connected library field can meet the challenges of the future. 

At workshops held across the globe, key players from the library field have prioritized actions that libraries may take in response to societal changes. Six questions – each with ten possible choices – were selected from the outcomes of these workshops. 

From 21 August until 30 September, library staff can cast their vote on these core questions to help IFLA produce a global library roadmap for the future. Visit this link during the voting period and share your input.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Last Call for Contributions to Column in the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship


This is a last call for contributions to the "E-Resource Round Up" column for volume 29, issue 4 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). 

Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, August 25, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton
Mississippi State University Libraries

Karen Davidson
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-3018             

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Professionals from Developing Countries can apply for the ALCTS Online Course Grant until August 24

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association, is now accepting applications for the Online Course Grant for Library Professionals from Developing Countries to participate in our online Fundamentals courses held between September 18, 2017 and December 22, 2017. One free seat per session is available to librarians and information professionals from developing countries.

For full information about the grant, including eligibility criteria and a link to the application form, please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant. Applications may be submitted between July 31, 2017 and August 24, 2017.

Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA)
Session 4: September 18 – October 27, 2017
Session 5:  November 6-December 15, 2017

The Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA) web course focuses on the basics of acquiring monographs and serials:  goals and methods, financial management of library collections budgets, and relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers, subscription agents, and publishers.  In this course, you will receive a broad overview of the operations involved in acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.  Note that in FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders, receives, and pays for those materials.

Fundamentals of Cataloging (FOC)
Session 4:  September 18 – October 27, 2017
Session 5:  November 6 – December 15, 2017

Fundamentals of Cataloging (FOC) web course begins with a discussion of how cataloging assists users in finding resources and of the value of standardization of practice. These foundations are then given practical grounding in the work of creating bibliographic descriptions, the process of subject analysis, and summarizing content utilizing classification. Standards such as MARC bibliographic and authority formats, Library of Congress Subject Headings and Library of Congress Classification are discussed. The shift in focus from format-based cataloging to entity-relationship model cataloging is taken from the FRBR foundation to the RDA practical application, with a final look at RDF triples and BIBFRAME. In all areas, the value of standards is illustrated and discussed. There is a heavy reliance on examples from actual practice throughout the course content.

Fundamentals of Collection Assessment (FCA)
Session 4:  October 2-November 10, 2017

This online course introduces the fundamental aspects of collection assessment in libraries. The course is designed for those who are responsible for or interested in collection assessment in all types and sizes of libraries. The course will introduce key concepts in collection assessment including the definition of collection assessment, techniques and tools, assessment of print and electronic collections, and project design and management.

Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management (FCDM)
Session 4: September 25 – October 20, 2017
Session 5: November 27 – December 22, 2017

The Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management web course addresses the basic components of these important areas of responsibility in libraries. Components include complete definition of collection development and collection management; collections policies and budgets as part of library planning; collection development (selecting for and building collections); collection management (e.g., making decisions after materials are selected, including decisions about withdrawal, transfer, preservation); collection analysis—why and how to do it; outreach, liaison, and marketing; trends and suggestions about the future for collection development and management.

Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA)
Session 4: September 25 – October 20, 2017
Session 5: November 27 – December 22, 2017

The Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA) web course will provide an overview of acquiring, providing access to, administering, supporting, and monitoring access to electronic resources.  It will provide a basic background in electronic resource acquisitions including product trials, licensing, purchasing methods, and pricing models and will provide an overview of the sometimes complex relationships between vendors, publishers, platform providers, and libraries.

Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP)
Session 4:  October 2 – November 10, 2017

The Fundamentals of Preservation web course introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives.  The course is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. It provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.  Components include preservation as a formal library function and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission; the primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning and careful handling of collections; the history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts preservation options; standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options; and challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship.

Shared on behalf of the ALCTS International Relations Committee,  American Library Association
http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant