Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Last Call for Contributions to Column in the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship


This is a last call for contributions to the "E-Resource Round Up" column for volume 29, issue 4 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). 

Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, August 25, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton
Mississippi State University Libraries

Karen Davidson
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-3018             

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Professionals from Developing Countries can apply for the ALCTS Online Course Grant until August 24

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association, is now accepting applications for the Online Course Grant for Library Professionals from Developing Countries to participate in our online Fundamentals courses held between September 18, 2017 and December 22, 2017. One free seat per session is available to librarians and information professionals from developing countries.

For full information about the grant, including eligibility criteria and a link to the application form, please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant. Applications may be submitted between July 31, 2017 and August 24, 2017.

Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA)
Session 4: September 18 – October 27, 2017
Session 5:  November 6-December 15, 2017

The Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA) web course focuses on the basics of acquiring monographs and serials:  goals and methods, financial management of library collections budgets, and relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers, subscription agents, and publishers.  In this course, you will receive a broad overview of the operations involved in acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.  Note that in FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders, receives, and pays for those materials.

Fundamentals of Cataloging (FOC)
Session 4:  September 18 – October 27, 2017
Session 5:  November 6 – December 15, 2017

Fundamentals of Cataloging (FOC) web course begins with a discussion of how cataloging assists users in finding resources and of the value of standardization of practice. These foundations are then given practical grounding in the work of creating bibliographic descriptions, the process of subject analysis, and summarizing content utilizing classification. Standards such as MARC bibliographic and authority formats, Library of Congress Subject Headings and Library of Congress Classification are discussed. The shift in focus from format-based cataloging to entity-relationship model cataloging is taken from the FRBR foundation to the RDA practical application, with a final look at RDF triples and BIBFRAME. In all areas, the value of standards is illustrated and discussed. There is a heavy reliance on examples from actual practice throughout the course content.

Fundamentals of Collection Assessment (FCA)
Session 4:  October 2-November 10, 2017

This online course introduces the fundamental aspects of collection assessment in libraries. The course is designed for those who are responsible for or interested in collection assessment in all types and sizes of libraries. The course will introduce key concepts in collection assessment including the definition of collection assessment, techniques and tools, assessment of print and electronic collections, and project design and management.

Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management (FCDM)
Session 4: September 25 – October 20, 2017
Session 5: November 27 – December 22, 2017

The Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management web course addresses the basic components of these important areas of responsibility in libraries. Components include complete definition of collection development and collection management; collections policies and budgets as part of library planning; collection development (selecting for and building collections); collection management (e.g., making decisions after materials are selected, including decisions about withdrawal, transfer, preservation); collection analysis—why and how to do it; outreach, liaison, and marketing; trends and suggestions about the future for collection development and management.

Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA)
Session 4: September 25 – October 20, 2017
Session 5: November 27 – December 22, 2017

The Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA) web course will provide an overview of acquiring, providing access to, administering, supporting, and monitoring access to electronic resources.  It will provide a basic background in electronic resource acquisitions including product trials, licensing, purchasing methods, and pricing models and will provide an overview of the sometimes complex relationships between vendors, publishers, platform providers, and libraries.

Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP)
Session 4:  October 2 – November 10, 2017

The Fundamentals of Preservation web course introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives.  The course is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. It provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.  Components include preservation as a formal library function and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission; the primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning and careful handling of collections; the history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts preservation options; standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options; and challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship.

Shared on behalf of the ALCTS International Relations Committee,  American Library Association
http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant

Friday, July 21, 2017

2017 Development and Access to Information Report launched


The DA2I Report shows how essential access to information is for development, and makes the case for coordinated and sustained efforts by all to guarantee it. It demonstrates how meaningful access to information, supported by libraries, contributes to the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and monitors the progress countries are making towards fulfilling their commitments under the UN 2030 Agenda.

As the Agenda for Sustainable Development progresses, the need to address the underlying factors holding back development in all our societies becomes more and more pressing. Few are as pernicious as information poverty – the lack of access to, or the ability to use, the information necessary to foster economically and socially inclusive societies. IFLA President Donna Scheeder stressed: “There is no sustainable development without access to information. And there is no meaningful, inclusive access to information without libraries.

In addition to the regulatory changes and infrastructure investment needed to ensure that everyone has the practical possibility to get online, the report calls for a coordinated drive to ensure that people have the confidence and skills needed to get the best out of the Internet. This will require contributions from all levels of government and across stakeholder groups.

To monitor Member States’ progress, the report presents a set of baseline indicators, drawing on established datasets, as well as providing contributions from international experts showing how access to information is already making a difference. The report focuses this year on four SDGs highlighted at this year’s UN HLPF – agriculture (SDG 2), health (SDG 3), gender equality (SDG 5), and infrastructure and innovation (SDG 9). 

Libraries, as pre-existing, trusted public centres, with both a global perspective and strong understanding of local needs, are essential partners for governments in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. IFLA is working globally to ensure libraries’ key contribution to development is recognised. It has signed agreements with representatives from 73 countries, committing to work with them to build understanding of the UN 2030 Agenda at a national and regional level, and engage in the planning, monitoring and implementation processes of National Development Plans. 

IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner remarked: “The library field is unique. A global community of millions of institutions, sharing the same values and objectives. IFLA, as the global voice of libraries, is proud to be able to bring this potential to bear in support of development. I believe that, together, we can deliver. The library field is certainly ready.

The report can be downloaded from the DA2I official website at DA2I.ifla.org.

Monday, July 10, 2017

The AfLIA Leadership Academy – Call for Applications


African Library & Information Associations & Institutions (AfLIA) is collaborating with the Public Library Association (PLA) to establish the AfLIA Leadership Academy aimed at:

    AfLIA logo
  • Building the knowledge, skills and confidence of library leaders to act in innovative and creative ways in meeting community needs;
  • Supporting library leaders to foster partnerships between libraries and government agencies, the private sector, NGOs, civil society, and faith-based organizations to work together to improve the lives of community members; and
  • Strengthening library leaders’ skills and assisting them find innovative approaches to library services, tangibly improving the value libraries bring to communities.
AfLIA invites applications from librarians working in public and national libraries to participate in the Leadership Academy, which begins in January 2018 and runs for eight months. The Academy aims to support middle managers in African public and national libraries to be true leaders
in their communities. Anticipated outcomes for participants are to:
  • Understand the nature and requirements of effective leadership and one’s own leadership style;
  • Gain a deep understanding of how to manage change and how to effectively carry out civic engagement;
  • Apply the concept of Asset Based Community Development using the assets within their communities to bring about positive change;
  • Understand the opportunities offered and challenges posed by partnering with both library and non-library organisations; and 
  • Form a network of engaged and transforming library leaders ready to lead in taking their national, African and Global Development agendas forward.
The Leadership Academy includes a five-day workshop in January 2018, followed by eight months of support from Coaches who are recognized leaders in the field. There will be three participants
assigned to each Coach.


Within the eight months, participants will be expected to:
  • Attend three webinars run by their Coaches and attended by the three people in their coaching group between February and May 2018.
  • Develop and implement a project geared at improving the livelihoods of the community.
  • Report on their work at the AfLIA Public Libraries Summit in May 2018.
  • Take a two week study visit to US public libraries (participants will pay for their travel costs including visa and travel insurance and AfLIA will pay for the accommodation and meals).
  • Take part in the evaluation of the Academy after eight months.
  • Continue to network with their colleagues at the Academy for a minimum period of one year.
Applicants must meet the following qualifying criteria:
  • Must be from an African public or national library service.
  • Must have at least three years of experience at managerial level.
  • Must be able to read and write in English (because the course is conducted in English).
  • Must have documented support from his/her organization.
  • Must be an active member of the local library association.
  • The institution to which he/she belongs must be a member of AfLIA.
In addition, it will be advantageous to be from an institution that is hosting/has hosted an INELI participant and have demonstrated leadership qualities.

Interested applicants should download and complete the Application Form at http://dl.aflia.net/AfLIA_leadership_form.docx
Send completed applications and all accompanying documents by email with the subject ‘Application for AfLIA Leadership Academy’ to programofficer@aflia.net with a copy to secretariat@aflia.net by August 18, 2017.

Institutional support should be in the form of an endorsement letter from the applicant's library, on the library’s letterhead and signed by the head of the institution or his/her representative,
scanned and included with the completed form.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Call for Proposals: Advances in Library Administration and Organization


Libraries have begun doing more to support entrepreneurship and innovation within their communities. Makerspaces and business incubators have become featured attractions in public and academic libraries and provide a unique way to reach out to a user group that can bolster a community in dynamic ways. ALAO seeks submissions for the “Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation” volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to look at how library leaders can develop support for innovation and entrepreneurship within their libraries. Examples include but are not limited to: analyzing case studies from several institutions to identify best practices; ways of designing library spaces to ensure they meet the needs of all constituents; theoretical discussions on how activities/spaces supporting entrepreneurship and innovation reflect the mission of libraries; creative ways to get resources to support efforts in these areas; how these areas can lead to new kinds of collaborations that benefit libraries.

Editors are particularly interested in proposals on the following topics:
  • How the historical and cultural role of libraries has changed (or not) to include services that support creativity and innovation.
  • How and why the development of makerspaces and incubators (or other innovative programs) supports the larger community in which the library is situated.
  • How innovative and entrepreneurial support develops new partnerships, and how those partnerships can be sustained.
If you are interested in contributing to this volume, send an abstract of 300 words or less as well as author details and estimated length of final submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu.
Proposal deadline: August 31, 2017. Notification of acceptance: October 31, 2017.

This will be the first volume of ALAO to publish in 2019.
Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College
Volume Editor: Janet Crum, Northern Arizona University

Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization. The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues. Through this series, practitioners can glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries. ALAO is published by Emerald Publishing
http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/books/series.htm?id=0732-0671


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Serbian Library Association annual conference focuses on advocacy and lobbying

Serbian Library Association (SLA) invites colleagues from across the globe to their annual conference "What I talk about when I talk about libraries: Advocacy, Promoting and Lobbying" to be held in Belgrade, Serbia December 13 - 15, 2017.
There will be pre-conference sessions on December 13 and the official conference begins on December 14th with amazing keynote speakers. December 14th is Librarians Day and SLA's 70th birthday, so they are planning a grand celebration!

SLA is currently accepting full papers, short presentations (Pecha Kucha) and poster presentations with topics related to advocacy, such as:
  • Visibility of libraries in the media and community
  • Skills and knowledge we need for advocacy
  • The role of libraries in the United Nations Agenda UN 2030 and society development
  • How do the different types of libraries support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?
  • Library statistics for the effective storytelling and performance
  • Budget and financing: do we have an alternative?
  • The role of library associations in advocating, lobbying and promotion
  • Partnerships and networking
  • Methods of communication with decision-makers
  • Campaigns, activism and social media
  • Multimedia and innovative tools
  • Library users as advocates
  • Communication strategy, public relations and marketing
  • Training programs, workshops and forums
Deadline for proposals is September 15. Visit the conference website for more information.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Awesome Foundation has an Innovation in Libraries chapter


It can be a challenge to keep the bills paid when you are working to get a new project off the ground.  The Awesome Foundation offers micro-grants of $1000 to help "forward the interest of awesome in the universe." Of course, not every aspiring project gets funded. However, a team of library and information professionals have created a new funding opportunity to help innovative library projects achieve success.

The Awesome Innovation in Libraries Chapter was created "by a small working group of passionate librarians within Library Pipeline who wanted to provide a catalyst for prototyping both technical and non-technical library innovations that embody the principles of diversity, inclusivity, creativity, and risk-taking."

The Chapter awards monthly grants; proposals are due on the 1st and decisions are rendered at the end of the month. There have already been some fantastic projects funded from around the world. Check out the winners so far and then submit your own application!

Friday, June 23, 2017

IFLA Global Vision Latin America and the Caribbean starts with an inspiring address by the Vice President of the Argentine Republic


BUENOS AIRES, Argentina, 9 June 2017—The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is holding its IFLA Global Vision Regional Workshop for Latin America and the Caribbean on 8 and 9 June 2017 at the historic Library of the National Congress in Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

The Vice President of the Argentine Republic, Lic. Gabriela Michetti, opened the event welcoming participants and highlighting the key role of libraries–especially public libraries–in providing free and democratic access to information fostering economic and social development. During her opening remarks, she stated: “We are very happy that the Library of the National Congress was chosen as one of IFLA’s Regional Offices, this shows a deserved recognition to the work and the trajectory of the library in the country and in the region”. About the Global Vision Regional Workshop, she mentioned: “It is a pleasure to be here today, and to share this moment with you. I hope you have a very productive and fruitful meeting.” 

IFLA President-elect Glòria Pérez-Salmerón, remarked: “Today we will start a workshop of the IFLA Global Vision Discussion, which is not a project, it is a process. Because we believe that the future is in our hands and that libraries can change how things are in society—for the better.”
IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner, emphasized: “For the realization of our ideas we will need the support of visionary policy makers. Today we heard a strong commitment of high political representatives to the central role of libraries for the development of societies.” 

The Latin American Regional Workshop gathers senior representatives of library associations and national libraries of 27 Latin American and Caribbean countries to discuss how a united and connected library field can tackle the challenges of the future. 

This is the forth in a series of six regional workshops taking place around the world. Two more workshops will be held in Singapore (28 – 29 June 2017) and in Madrid, Spain (5 – 6 July 2017).
Read more about the IFLA Global Vision Discussion: globalvision.ifla.org
 
For more information, contact globalvision@ifla.org